a million lights

The first (documented) recording alias of Chris Andrews – I.E. the creator of this website. In 2004 I compiled a 4-song EP of original recordings and got them pressed in the very limited capacity of 20 copies through Peter King, down in Mt. Somers (in a single day!, June 24th 2004), each with a unique cover and hand-numbered. The music contained within varies between low-key melodic tremblings on the a side, to caustic, but carefully controlled feedback-entrenched drones and shards of sound (extract with the help of cubase’s many distortion tools – from a bass guitar) on the b of an 8″ lathe-cut.

This highly limited 8″ lathe comes to us from the beautiful islands of New Zealand, a place known for it’s exquisite experimental music. These four short compositions by Chris Andrews heavily feature bass as a predominant instrument. Their minimalistic structures and instrumentation give the four tracks on “a million lights” an open-air feeling. It’s like soaring through the night sky, breathing ice cold air into your lungs. i love how sparse these pieces are. Both “Build 2” and “Thumping Around” show off a sense of melody. While these tracks are all instrumental, these two have a catchiness to them that will lodge itself firmly inside your skull
Brad Rose; Foxy Digitalis

This EP is actually an archival release, constructed from some of the most thematically aligned instrumental pieces in my recording archives, which date back to around 2000. playing primarily bass guitar, but also a little keyboard and rudimentary drumming, the ep is a work of studio-production, and differs quite markedly from my live band, the diana mckay led post-punk 4-piece Idols Of Eve.

The piece de resistance of “a million lights” is the opening to side b, “Error 404.” With shades of Roy Montgomery and Windy and Carl, this spacey guitar drone is mesmerizing. A heavy low-end gives this track depth, and Andrews’ melodic tendencies shine through again. It ascends and descends through the clouds like a soaring bird. It’s an excellent track and deserves repeated listens. He closes the album with “Rebel,” which is reminiscent of the previous track. It’s like a more stripped down, heavily processed version of it. It’s a solid ending to a very solid release. I hope to hear more of Andrews’ material in the future
Brad Rose; Foxy Digitalis

On January 14th, 2005 I made my live solo debut at the ‘Southern Oscillations’ festival at Castle Hill, Central Canterbury. I performed a 40 minute set comprised of material from my simultaneously released debut full-length cd-r, coming on after krkrkrk artist / co-founder K-Mz Robinson (of NoTV / TMA-1).

The performance went well, playing to a small crowd on the opening night of the festival, drawing a good response and prompting a make-shift encore. Significant about the live performance was that i’ve now taken to playing guitar in a live capacity, just 3 weeks after purchasing my first (non-bass) guitar. using my pc for backing and live processing, the guitar is used primarily to spike the live sound with a higher register wave of sound, which can rise and fall between quite aggressive shards of noise to glacial waves.

Discography (Picks In Bold)

  • a million lights EP [2004 Self-Released]
  • Album [2005 Self-Released]

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Mysterioball

Now defunct old christchurch punk band from the late 90s / early 00s based around core members kyle denovan on guitar and vocals, and myself (chris andrews) on bass and accompaning vocals. Starting with just the duo and playing to a small crowd at the green room, mysterioball had the loosest of punk asthetics, finishing their debut performance (which was actually part of a christchurch arts festival gig, coming on after a play!) with a swag of Springstein covers. All very fun, the group soon expanded to include denovan’s fellow flux capicitor member joe 90, an an estwhile drummer named Terry ‘the grieval deviant’.

After an unsuccessful party performance, Joe was dropped, and Mysterioball acquired themselves a saxophonist by the name of ‘Big’ Thom, who had achieved a touch of national celebrity thanks to an unhealthy little party trick. Thom had won a local bars how low will you go competition by performing a strange little routine that involved stapling his penis and testicle’s to a large wooden cross, dangling the cross between his legs, then setting the item on fire.. Not exactly something for squemish. The band played on, creating a number of badly recorded home-demo’s and playing to fair crowds at either the jetset lounge or (their favourite) the provincial, never really growing past their amateur approach, but always playing with a lot of energy and fun.

The summer of 2000 brought about a migration north for Thom and Terry – and without support Chris and Kyle disbanded the group, which by now had accumulated some 15 original songs, and went their seperate ways. Denovan later resurfaced with a handful of like-minded groups, even playing mysterioball songs with the rocking whores, whilst i went on to join Idols of Eve in 2003. Though Thom resurfaced in 2001 to play drums with Super-Yacht – a coloborative one-off performance alongside Denovan, myself, and the Idols‘ Diana McKaye and Jason Tamahana-Bryce, he soon disappeared again.

Discography (picks in bold)

See-Also