Quadrophenia

Also known as: Daegar Bar, Bar Particular

Location: 651 Colombo Street, Central Christchurch

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Current Status: Demolished post-earthquake, now part of Ballantynes

Active as a live music venue: 1993 – 1996?

Bar Manager: The Yee Family

All-Ages: No

Central city bar that had live shows from local bands such as Future StupidLoves Ugly Children, Range, Hawaii Five-O, Creeley, Ape Management, Brother Love, Space Dust, Snort, Squirm, Pumpkinhead and early Salmonella Dub, plus touring groups such as Superette, Nothing At All, and Wendy House.

Located upstairs on the corner of Lichfield and Colombo Streets (though the address is Colombo Street, the entrance was actually on Lichfield) and ran by the Yee family for a few years in the mid 90’s.

..Open around mid ’93. Owned by the Yee Family. Had bands and then even had happy hardcore/trance parties! Daega Bar was downstairs to the left of the main entrance. Got demoed and replaced with the Contemporary Lounge part of Ballantynes.

-Tim Baird (Pinacolada Records)

Posters from the era show that it was a very regular venue with shows 4 nights a week and close ties to both then-student radio station RDU and local skate and clothing outlet Cheap Skates.

Particularly notable are posters from Ape Management‘s Rock Hardman, showing a very dynamic comic style which would also feature on Ape Management (and other Homebacon groups) art work over the coming years, along with further posters at the likes of Warners and His Lordships.

History

1993?: Quadrophenia opens as a venue hosting bands up to 4 nights a week

1996?: Quadrophenia closes, replaced by Daegar Bar?

2011: Building is heavily damaged and eventually demolished after the Canterbury Earthquakes, replaced by what is now part of Ballantynes.

Contact Details

Links

Rubicon

Originally an inane Auckland-based pop-rock 3-piece formed by ex-Christchurch lads Paul Reid (vocals / guitar / drums – previously of both the D4 and Loves Ugly Children‘s last drummer) and Gene Bennet (drums), with Aucklander Jon Corker (bass). Reid was also known as a character on Shortland Street – New Zealand’s longest running soap-opera tv series.

After spending a great chunk of Wildside‘s ever-depleting cash for the release of 2002’s under-selling Primary Colours, in mid 2004 Bennet and Corker left the group to pursue their own interests. Reid took the opportunity to permanently relocate to Los Angeles (where the band had been attempting to make a break) and he has since formed plans for a new session-musician based version of Rubicon. Generally pandering crap to be avoided at all costs.

Discography (picks in bold)

  • ‘The Captain’ Cd Single [2000 Wildside]

  • ‘Funny Boy’ Cd Single [2001 Wildside]

  • ‘Bruce’ Cd Single [2001 Wildside]

  • Primary [2002 Wildside]

  • ‘Rockstar (Yeah Yeah)’ Cd Single [2002 Wildside]

  • ‘Drive’ Cd Single [2004 Wildside]

  • ‘Remember’ Cd Single [2005 Wildside]

  • The Way It Was Meant To Be [2005 Wildside]

See-Also

Royce T Doyster

..A loose cowpunk outfit that played a mixture of originals and country covers. Royce T Doyster got compared to the Violent Femmes a lot, mostly because people couldn’t see past the stand up drums. The band played 15 gigs altogether, the first at 303 Cashel St (a private venue in Christchurch at the time) in 1990, with the Axel Grinders, and the last one in 1993 in a warehouse in Litchfield st with a band called Cheese.
– Dave Clark

Christchurch outfit comprised of David Clark (aka Dragstrip – guitar / vocals), Chris Clements (bass / vocals) and Simon McLaren (Loves Ugly Children, Sleepers Union – stand-up drums / vocals).

They recorded one song, ‘Ukulele’, with David Wernham at a crappy studio that was run as part of the access scheme, (the government unemployment initiative of the time). ‘Ukulele’ received some airplay on student radio. Audio and video recordings were made of the first two shows at 303 Cashel st in 1990, the videos are hilarious because the guy that did them had a new-fangled sony effects unit which he proceeded to put over almost everything, they played two gigs in Dunedin with Sex Trash Automobile, won a busking competition and supported a touring comedy act at the university.

Discography (picks in bold)

  • no major releases

See-Also

Simon McLaren on Sleepers Union [August 2003]

This interview was conducted with Simon McLaren via email in late 2003; on the eve of the launch of his terrific ‘Giant Spheres’ album, released under the then-new moniker of Sleepers Union.

First of all, we know you’re well inclined to try out different styles with your different bands, from the loud and brash approach of Loves Ugly Children, to the driving, charismatic approach of The Subliminals. How do you describe your current album to fans of your previous work?

I guess an uncomplicated answer to that is that this has turned out to be a psychedelic pop / psychedelic soft rock record. If you’re a fan of that genre in any way then you should like the Giant Spheres record. In terms of my history, it kinda carries along from The Subliminals vibe, which had a definite psychedelic quality, or perhaps some form of psychedelic anxiety about itself anyway.

A major difference is that Sleepers Union is about the vocals as well as the music, as I enjoyed the writing process, using language haphazardly by blending bunches of lines together until I could see symmetries or juxtapositions arise.

What was the song-writing process for the album?

Basically I had a mini-disc and an acoustic guitar – some tuning variations and some spare time. It’s a process of capturing ides or snippets of song possibilities and then deciding later which ones fit the current project. I love the simplicity and smallness of the mini-disc, it’s so easy just to capture ideas off the cuff- unlike having a four-track or computer set up which is less portable. A good example is ‘Waking From The Dream’ which was written and demoed very quickly at 2 in the morning one night when I couldn’t sleep. I managed to capture a moment, with just a snapshot of the sleepy melody, lyrics and chords before I returned to bed. Later on that song got recorded onto my pc and then transferred and worked on again on Dales mac.

But it’s really a very normal songwriting process in that I just write songs and then keep the ones I like. If I happen to write and record a good one it seems to inspire more.. Which is what happened with this record starting with the song silver cloud, the first finished tune. It was a song I had written while in The Subliminals, and the subs played it a few times. Anyway it kinda set the agenda for the rest of the record.

Sounds like the old Keith Richard’s legend of him writing the riff for ‘Satisfaction’ in his sleep! With this kind of immediate idea-capturing, was the production studio based, or did you flesh out full songs first before committing it to pc?

Well there was no band, so there was no flesh, so to speak of, that we could record. The songs had only been demoed with me playing acoustic, accompanied by Mark Anderson playing bass. When we recorded the drums with Matthew Heine and with Brendan Moran, neither of them had heard the songs before that day.

I guess that was the point of not starting a band, so that nobody else could really have early control of the textures or structures: I could build my tunes completely from the basement up for a change. It’s definitely a better record for escaping the trap that many NZ bands fall into; that is, the territorial possessiveness that members unconsciously yield in terms of their instruments frequency range. Like a guitarist in a band who thinks that he should play on every track on a record, because that’s how the tunes were conceived (with him playing along).

It’s harder in that instance to avoid a big cloggy mid range guitar (for instance) filling up the frequencies of a bunch of tunes on a record, when those frequencies may not even be needed. All of a sudden your not making a record anymore, your actually in the process of allowing a bunch of your friends to trample over some songs.. And I guess if you are at a point when these kind of doubts crop up, then its definitely time to make a solo record!

Did you go looking for lyrical inspiration, or did it come to you?, I always find the hardest thing about writing lyrics is not making it seem forced.

Well, lyrically speaking, there was some kinda blueprint that I was consciously writing towards, which meant that I could begin tunes with either chords that fitted in to the concept or with lyrics that fitted. Either could trigger a new song, so different songs appeared lyrically via different processes. The most labored song lyrically doesn’t actually have that many lyrics. Which is ‘Collect My Particles’. Originally it was called ‘Silhouette Notebook’ but when we recorded the music we extended it quite a bit naturally, as we were enjoying playing it- so it seemed like another song by the time I got around to doing the vocals.

I had doubt whether a song called ‘Silhouette Notebook’ would actually be on the kind of record I wanted to produce, and so a new title ‘Catch My Particles’ got attached to the tune. Then of course, I had to rewrite the melody and lyrics to match the new title. While it had no lyrics I heard the opportunity for a kinda Beatles style ‘Ooo-Wah-La-La-La-La’ to garnish the descending riff, so I recorded that first; and then I tried to write the main vocals comfortably around it. Anyway by the end of it the song was ‘Collect My Particles’ instead of ‘Catch My Particles’.

‘Giant Spheres’ was another song that I had the title of first, and then I tried to write a song around the title. ‘She Seems Fluorescent’ is the same.

With Shayne Carter’s Dimmer project we heard about him going in to seclusion and learning to play music again, outside the band environment. Did you find yourself in a foreign predicament when creating this album?

Yeah it seemed kinda foreign to have total control of the project, total freedom to do anything I was capable of, and also to have enough time and support on my hands to develop the project. Because of this, it is less rushed and more thought out then any of the records I have made for Flying Nun. Turbine told me I could record an album of processed static if I wanted too and that they would still release it. Which is funny at hindsight, as I was actually messing around with a more computer generated, less organic sound – not song orientated at all. The fact that I had no ideological record company pressure on me just lightened the whole situation, which in turn meant that it was way more plausible for me to actually feel comfortable enough to write some pop music.

It seems kind of fitting then that you’ve finished with perhaps a more ‘pop’ result than your efforts under Flying Nun. Do you think this freedom had an impact on the overall direction of the album?

Yeah the freedom to do what the hell I wanted was exhilarating. Even if it was a bluff, it was a great bluff, as it got me writing without any boundaries. I felt relaxed.. I worked on a bunch of weirdo tunes on my pc (‘My Dream Of Cygnus The Swan’ being the one that made it onto ‘Giant Spheres’) until I had a bunch of these anti-songs together, enough to expand into an album. After that I kinda just relaxed into writing some pop tunes, which in turn became the actual basis for the record.

The Subliminals were such a fresh and invigorating band – possibly yet to reach their peak, what made the band decide to call it quits?

Uhhh, to be honest the band just imploded, it just happened that way.. The goodwill left the building and it just wasn’t going to come back. The band would have had to have developed musically to continue, but that would have meant rewriting some of the rules that we had set ourselves to start off with. Basically it got complicated just at the time when we had all run out of goodwill, and that just stopped it all dead in its tracks.

And do you regret the conclusion of any of your previous projects?

Yeah, i’m still pissed about the Subliminals. It was a cool band. But y’know, as they say: as one door shuts, a window opens in the back.

Any plans to put together a touring support band?

The Sleepers Union band is just materializing as we speak. It looks at this stage as if its gonna be me, Francis Hunt(Fang Stereobus) on extra gat, Dave Yetton (Stereobus) on bass, and Simon Reid (Stayfree-Carefree) on drums.

Sounds like one-hell of a great band you’re putting together, is Dave looking forward to taking the support role?

Yeah, the bands just started, its sounding great already, its quite exciting.

With a psychedelic sound on the album, can we expect any electric jugs (ala The 13th Floor Elevators), heavy tremolo, or crazy mid-song freak-outs?

Well its early days in the band room yet. Tremelo will definitely feature. Weirdness of some description will be sought and hopefully attained. The few practices so far have sounded to me like really messed up, but at the same time really melodic, rock music. It’s very raw compared to the record, but it seems good like that. Uh yeah, and i’m still considering keyboards, to throw some extra loopiness into the mix.

New Zealand music seems to be in a transitional phase at the moment, with the memories of older bands starting to fade, and an emphasis on new, audience-focused bands coming to play. What direction do you see the (perhaps more underground) rock scene taking in the next few years?

I don’t really understand this question. Do you mean to say that bands, back in the day, used to focus on their music, but that now instead they are focusing on the audience (which is in turn, focusing on them)? Like narcissus frozen staring at his own reflection, the band members, overcome by spectacle, forget to actually listen to the sound that they make?

Uhhh- anyways-. As for seeing a direction for NZ underground bands-. Isn’t it meant to be going post-punk, hard edged new-wave? That crossover period, like Gang Of Four (except that that influence has still been felt all along via shellac, hasn’t it?). I’m not sure.

In terms of guitar bands, there may be apparent to some a pathway clear between two certain extremes: the dominant culture of new-old-rock, and its quiet nemesis, those of the purposefully-twee-brigade. In between somewhere there’s kind of a huge gap for alternative rock bands to arrive that aren’t entirely retrospective in focus.

Maybe the New Zealand nameless-lost-guitar-band-fraternity could all ‘accidentally’ embrace psychedelic at the same, as they discover that its y’know, like one of our really cool heritages – these bands could support and help each other, to play on spitefully and determinedly in total indifference to world trends.

Sleepers Union

Blissful psychedelic pop from Simon Mclaren, known for his high-energy, explosive songs in Loves Ugly Children and The Subliminals. ‘Giant Spheres’ [2003] was the product of mclaren being left to his own devices and finding a thoroughly appealing new voice, full of melody and majestic beauty.

Discography (picks in bold)

  • Giant Spheres [2003 Turbine Turbine002]

See-Also

Throw

Biography

The strange and confusing career of Throw has spawned some of the more successful and impressive releases for the Failsafe label. The band sprung from Failsafe boss Rob Mayes desire to create a studio based song writing ensemble which would have a transitional line-up as the song required.

In late 91 Mayes enlisted drummer Steve Birss again, the pair having patched things up (once again) after Birss’s split from Dolphin in early 1990. Birss had been playing in British influenced four piece Elevation (with David Hunt – guitar, Dylan – bass and Jeremy Talyor – guitar and vocals).

Taylor was enlisted for Throw to add vocals and guitar and in mid 91 Throw did their first ‘rehearsal’ , nutting out a few ideas which were to spawn the tracks ‘Honeyblonde’, ‘Time untied’ and ‘Blinder’. The next week the band recorded their practice and sent away the three songs to the QEII Arts Council for grant consideration.

At the end of that week Throw performed their first gig in support of Naked Lunch at a private party, followed the next week by supports for The Bats and Breathing Cage. Throw quickly built up a strong set of material and in the space of a few weeks had penned the 17 songs which became their stable set.

A month later Throw were headlining their own show at the Dux de Lux followed by a trip to Wellington with co-Christchurch bands Naked Lunch and Loves Ugly Children, playing a gig at the new Carpark to average attendance, and an Upper Hutt show to 6 locals and a bunch of locals who hung out in the other bar, who didn’t like anything you couldn’t ride your motor bike to. Throw also picked up one extra show at hip and happening venue Bar Bodega with ex-Christchurch man Nigel Mitchell’s new outfit, now Wellington based.

This proved to be a luck move for Throw, impressing the local crowd and particularly bar owner Fraser McInnes who took a strong liking to the band and immediately booked them to perform again. McInnes championing of Throw would spill over to Taylor’s post Throw project Cinematic, resulting in Bodega releasing the bands first album.

The Throw project in effect snowballed away from the original intention of keeping the line-up fluid and studio based and the Mayes/Birss/Taylor line-up found themselves heavily occupied with recording and performing over the next 12 months. After the initial rush had died down the band hit some internal political problems with singer Taylor wanting to claim full song writing credit for all material.

Mayes objected to this on the grounds that at least half of the bands music was written or originated from Mayes ideas, and all the material the band performed was worked on and contributed to by all members. Taylor being somewhat of a jukebox for modern pop songs, if he has heard a song he can most times play a version of it.

Taylor later conceded sometimes he couldn’t remember which stuff he’d written and which stuff he’d memorized from music he’d heard. This proves to be somewhat of a problem for the band during writing stages for the group as tunes initiated by Taylor sometimes bore strong resemblance’s to music Taylor had recently heard, and in some cases to Mayes own material he had presented at previous rehearsals.

After a few months of heated contemplation the songs were eventually registered with 1/3 credit to taylor/Mayes/Birss, but the situation had led Birssto limit his commitment to the project and Birsswould now only perform in Christchurch, and for recordings. Mayes enlisted Caroline Easther to drum for the bands North Island shows, Mayes being a fan of Easther’s drumming since her days in Beat Rhythm Fashion, through to The Chills, Verlaines, and Easther’s own band.

Relations with Taylor continued to strain, perhaps due to Throws instant success, something both Mayes and Birss had been used to with their work in Dolphin, but the young Taylor (20) had difficulty with, falling foul of the rock and roll ego syndrome.

Taylor, Mayes and Birss shoot a video for the lead track ‘Wishes from her heart’ on the forthcoming ‘All different things’ EP at the picturesque Castle Hill, the band perched precariously on rock top, during intermittent snow and sunshine. Throw continued to perform around the country working to ward their Arts Council Fund debut EP release. Throw’s work with Taylor culminated in a series of concerts building up to the release of the ‘All different things’ EP.

Taylor and Mayes played shows in Hamilton and Auckland (Powerstation with Semi Lemon Kola and The Nixons) with Easther drumming. These shows were followed by a Wellington date with Easther and a Palmerston North show as two piece with drums on backing tape, at the Feast of Stevens own EP release party. Throw were joined by Feasties drummer Glen Fletcher for the last song of their set away, a tense controlled number.

Fletcher had that day committed himself to a psychiatric hospital for mental stress, leaving the Feast of Stevens to spring him for their gig. Throw started ok with “away” but by the end of it the song was racing out of control, leaving everyone present much amused.

Taylor and Mayes drive back to Wellington straight after their Palmerston North set and find themselves at Bar Bodega with a small crowd of people and so play their two piece line-up set to excellent response. Mayes and Taylor return to Christchurch to prepare for their EP release concerts which entail a release party at Mainstreet Cafe where the band were to perform in a stripped back fashion as opposed to their normally full on power gigs, and a concert at the Dux de Lux.

Tension between Mayes and Taylor had been brewing progressively over the previous few gigs and the situation came to a head on the day of their Mainstreet Cafe release party, resulting in Taylor refusing to attend. Throw played their last performance in the original line up at the Dux at the end of September with the band not saying a word to each other throughout the gig. Mayes takes the next few months to work on the album, finishing off the songs the band had laid the basic tracks down for at the time of recording the EP.

The album is finished in mid 1994 with initial singles being released to New Zealand on Air for inclusion on the ‘Kiwi Hit Disc’ series. Taylor’s desire to pursue his solo song writing leads him to form Cinematic and he recruits bassist James Gutherie, guitarist – and drummer Steve Birss. Cinematic go on to record and release a debut album with that line-up, followed by a further two albums in the mid to late 90s. ‘Falling inside me’ is released as a single backed with ‘Freefall’ and receives a video grant from New Zealand on Air.

The video is directed by Jonathon King and features Auckland actress Rebecca wandering round Auckland rooftops looking pouty and plaintive. The finished video is some way away from the brief given to King. A still from the video is used for the ‘Rememory’ album cover. In march 95 the ‘Rememory’ album is released. ‘Nowhere near’ is released as a single backed with ‘Time untied’, a track with it’s origins in Taylor and Birss’s previous band Elevation. The track also receives an NZ on Air video grant, the video being directed by film maker David Reid.

Mayes is again unimpressed with the directors interpretation of the bands music, the finished video result being some sort of a yuppy pool room love story. In June 95 Throw get another video grant this time for the track ‘Honeyblonde’. Mayes decides to work with camera man Brett Nicols and director and animator Gregg Page who had worked on the springloader video. Mayes also attends the film shoot and assists page on the video which is an animated claymation performance based video, showing the band performing as clay figures.

The video was nominated for a New Zealand music award as best music video, along with videos from Supergroove and Shihad. In August 95 ‘All different things’ receives a video grant and Page and Nicols again make a video for this track, based on the story of a scientist who creates a three piece band to perform a love song to impress a girl.

Mayes shifts to London in November 95 and continues to work on material for the follow-up album, ‘Dream baby good-bye’, which features unreleased re-worked material from the original 1992 sessions as well as recently recorded material.
– Rob Mayes of Failsafe Records

Members

  • Rob Mayes
  • Jeremy Taylor (Guitar/Vocals)
  • Steve Birss (Drums)
  • Caroline Easther (Drums)

Discography

  • Falling Inside You Single (Failsafe Records)
  • All Different Things EP (1992 Failsafe Records)
  • Rememory (1995, Failsafe Records)
  • Nowhere Near Single (1995, Failsafe Records)
  • Dream Baby Goodbye (1995, Failsafe Records)

Links

The Subliminals

Short-lived group containing Simon Mclaren (Gat/Vox – Loves Ugly Children, Sleepers Union), Brendan Moran (Drums – Hasselhoff Experiment) Steven Reay (Gguitar) And Jared Johnson (Bass) that put out one of the best albums of 2000 with the driving, enthralling United States on Flying Nun.

Simon retained the Loves Ugly’s knack for catchy songs and added one of the most explosive music backings available thanks to one hell of a strong rhythm section. Moran is already famous for being one half of the incredibly loud duo known as The Hasselhoff Experiment, and The Subliminals allowed him freedom for more diverse drumming – instead of the freight-train-straight-to-hell approach of the Hasselhoffs’.

The star of the album, though is Jared Johnsons driving bass – essentially the lead instrument on a number of the albums best tracks – they could survive on being just an insturmental band. But to make things even better, both the vocals and the guitar were top notch, they’d put on a scorching live performance were everybody in the house would scream along and dance to their groovy numbers. Sad then that early this year they called it quits – all the boys moving on to their own new project.

The group did however re-unite for Flying Nun’s 30th Birthday Celebrations, playing shows up and down the country with The Clean.

Discography (picks in bold)

See-Also

Ape Management

Biography

Weird old Christchurch hard/sludge rock act who put out a few releases in the mid to late 90s.

Made up of prominent poster artist Rock Hardman (aka Rob Haakman – vocals), Martin Henderson (aka Brother Love – guitar), Dave Clarke (who now performs as Dragstrip – guitar), and Ken Mexted (aka Ken E Bear – drums), with Steve Pikelet, Mike Brassell (aka the late-great Mike Hex of Squirm), George ‘Wade’ Churton (aka Gene Pool Belmondo of the McGoohans) and Alan Clark taking up the revolving bass player role.

In Nov 94 they embarked on the ‘Naked and Hairy’ tour that would take them from Dunedin to Auckland via the West Coast. Shows were poorly attended in the lower South Island, and their show at the Bonsai Pizzeria in Greymouth, though played to a packed venue, incited a bout of window smashing in the local population that closed the Bonsai as a venue for bands and left the Apes with nowhere (with the exception of Gonks harvest parties) to play on the Coast.
Future tours (May ’95, August ’95, and March ’96) concentrated on Wellington, Palmerston North, and Auckland as the audiences that the Apes attracted in these centers were larger and more receptive than in their hometown, where a few sloppy performances had affected their reputation.
It was this relative success that would lead to their decision move to Wellington in 1997; A move that would be their ultimate undoing
– Dave Clark

Ape Management were a crucial player in the strong mid-90’s underground Christchurch scene, often sharing bills with the likes of Loves Ugly Children, and organizing and promoting gigs around town. bassist Brassell was a central figure in Christchurch, running the Noseflute label, and planning many events out of his Hexcentral abode / practice space. As a band, Ape Management were as loose as it could get, a raunchy rock’n’roll outfit with a noisy bent and brilliantly lurid visual style.

David Clark and Gene Pool Belmondo opted to stay behind in Christchurch when the three remaining members relocated to wellington in early 1997.
Clark had recently had a baby, and Belmondo was in the process of writing his history of NZ Punk, ‘Have you checked the children?’.
Upon arrival to Wellington the Apes recruited Alan Clark, formerly of Celtic act Banshee Reel, as bass player/manager and played as a 4-piece. Things in capital city, however, did not go as planned and when David moved to wellington in February 1998 to rejoin the band he found there was no band left to join.
– Dave Clark

Members

  • Rob Haakman (Vocals/Keyboards)
  • Martin Henderson (Guitar/Bass)
  • Dave Clarke (Guitar/Bass)
  • Ken Mexted (Drums)
  • Steve Pikelet (Bass)
  • Mike Brassell (Bass)
  • George Churton (Bass)
  • Alan Clark (Bass)

Discography

  • Big Hair 7″ EP (1995, Homebacon, GO APE1)
  • Simply The Beast (1995, Homebacon/Zero Records, 0008 )

Links

 

Loves Ugly Children

[profile contribution thanks to jason young and rob mayes – mayes has written a detailed description of his connections to the band which is available on the failsafe website, though there is obviously some contention over certain elements of the groups history]
loves ugly children was formed in christchurch in 1989 by vocalist/guitarist simon maclaren (blue flesh syndrome), featuring scott mcarthur – guitar, floss (angela leslie) – bass and simon crockett – drums (trawler). after playing its debut gig supporting dolphin at the subway, the band recorded five tracks in maclaren’s old mill warehouse with rob mayes, which appeared on the tape-only release ‘stagger’ (failsafe). when floss split with mcarthur to pursue a relationship with maclaren, they continued their music as a three piece under another name, with maclaren singing and playing guitar and a new drummer from dunedin, greg. they didn’t play any material from the previous line up, though they did decide to revert back to the name loves ugly children. after recording several songs, none of which were released, greg was offered an album and tour with the verlaines, and left the band during july ’90.
the uglies again ceased to exist for nine months, simon and floss playing in other chch bands including the hilarious sex trash automobile.a jam with neighbour jason young (excellent soul therapy and cultivation) during may ’91 led to the reformation of loves ugly children with their first gig only two weeks after that. quite a few important songs were created in these first two weeks including ‘good things’, ‘strangers song’ and ‘love you dead’ which became standards in the luc set for the next couple of years. a recording at arnie van bussel’s nightshift studio led to a tape-only release of ‘good things’ which went on to be #1 on rdu radio station. the first six months saw luc play many shows, win a war of the bands at the carlton and tour the south island, returning to find themselves parked solidly at the forefront of the chch scene.

Simon McLaren

a bit of a chameleon really, mclaren has been the front man for two highly under-rated kiwi outfits – sludge-rockers loves ugly children and the unfortunately short-lived post-rock out the subliminals. he then released his first solo album, now under the ‘sleepers union’ moniker. another change in direction – sleepers union’s ‘giant spheres’ is an excercise in lush psychedelic pop, and must surely be one of 2003’s best albums.
discography
picks in bold

  • giant spheres [as sleepers union 2003 turbine turbine003]

interviews
aug 2003